Paul, for his part, gives examples of thanksgiving prayer, expressed in various forms, at the beginning of his letters

Paul, for his part, gives examples of thanksgiving prayer, expressed in various forms, at the beginning of his letters

50. The Acts frequently show Christians at prayer, either individually (Ac 9:40; 10:9, etc.) or together (4:24-30; , etc.), in the Temple (2:46; 3:1), in houses (2:46), and even in prison (). Sometimes prayer is accompanied by fasting (13:3; ). In the New Testament, prayer formulas are usually hymnic: the Magnificat (Lk 1:46-55), the Benedictus (1:68-79), the Nunc dimittis (2:29-32) and numerous passages in the Book of Revelation. They are moulded in biblical language. In the Pauline corpus, hymns are Christological, 199 reflecting the Church’s liturgy. Like the prayer of Jesus, Christian prayer utilises the Jewish ber

But taking up the criticism expressed in the Prophets and Psalms, 204 it denies all efficacy to animal sacrifices for the purification of conscience and for the establishment of a deep relationship with God

h (“Blessed be God. ”). 200 In a Hellenistic milieu it was more charismatic (1 Co 14:2,16-18). Prayer is the work of the Spirit of God. 201 Certain things are possible only through prayer (Mk 9:29).

The “Lord’s Supper” (1 Co ) occupies a prominent place in the traditions. 202 Its form resembles the liturgy of Jewish festal meals: ber

h over the bread at the beginning, over the wine at the end. From the tradition underlying 1 Co -25 and the Synoptic narratives, the two blessings were brought closer in such a way that the meal was placed, not in between, but either before or after. This rite is a memorial of Christ’s passion (1 Co -25); it creates fellowship (koin(o-)nia: 1 Co ) between the risen Christ and his disciples. Continue reading